Editorial

British sculpture 'outre-Manche'

AN EDITORIAL IN this Magazine in 1976 commented on the 'new and strange' success that British artists were then having in Paris. Numerous exhibitions of British art, many of them promoted by the British Council, began to appear in France from about the time of Francis Bacon's retrospective at the Grand Palais in 1971. A bastion had been breached, and not only with contemporary art. The Louvre was making important acquisitions of works of the British School (by Turner, Fuseli, Wright of Derby), and in 1975 a whole issue of André Chastel's Revue de l'Art had been devoted to art from Britain. The Editorial concluded by summarising British opinion on this change in French attitudes: 'We mourn its loss of supremacy. We hail its new-found open-mindedness.'

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    By T. A. Heslop

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    By Brooks Beaulieu

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