Editorial

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  • New light on some portraits by Aelbert Cuyp

    By John Loughman

    THE SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY DUTCH artist Aelbert Cuyp (1620–91) is principally remembered today as a landscape painter and is especially associated with bucolic images of cattle grazing or resting in a sun-drenched idyll. However, this is a rather blinkered view of the artist’s range and his output was considerably more diverse. One aspect of his work that has long been overshadowed by the considerable reputation of his landscapes is his portraiture. Even his fellow townsman and contemporary Arnold Houbraken neglected to mention his activities as a portrait painter. While Cornelis Hofstede de Groot’s catalogue raisonné of Cuyp’s œuvre wildly overestimated his portrait production, listing almost one hundred, Alan Chong’s recent reassessment yields a much more modest harvest.

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  • Princess, countess, lover or wife? Liotard’s ‘lady on a sofa’

    By Duncan Bull

    THE RISE OF Jean-Etienne Liotard’s reputation during the twentieth century was largely spurred by the opening of the Rijksmuseum’s new building in Amsterdam in 1885. In it twenty-two works by him were displayed – far more than in any other collection at a time when he was chiefly known for La belle chocolatière at Dresden. Two of them are now ranked among his masterpieces – the ‘snapshot’ View of Mont Blanc from the artist’s studio; and the off-centre image of a pensive woman in Levan­tine dress seated on an ottoman (Fig.12) – long identified as Maria Gunning, Countess of Coventry – that is the subject of this article.

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  • ‘Pictures properly framed’: Degas and innovation in Impressionist frames

    By Elizabeth W. Easton,Jared Bark

    ‘DEGAS ONCE TOLD me he considered it an artist’s duty to see his pictures properly framed’, recounted Louisine Havemeyer in Sixteen to Sixty: Memoirs of a Collector. Although a seemingly simple statement, it does not precisely clarify what Degas intended by ‘properly framed’. New evidence has come to light that elucidates Degas’s choices for the presentation of his work. Additional research also pays tribute to the particular sensitivity of Mrs Havemeyer, one of the greatest collectors of Impressionist art whose collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, contains one of the most significant groups of original frames.

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  • Archaeology in Architecture: Studies in Honor of Cecil L. Striker

    By Robin Cormack
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  • The Mind’s Eye. Art and Theological Argument in the Middle Ages

    By Julian Luxford
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  • Il mondo dei pittori a Bologna, 1348–1430

    By Robert Gibbs
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  • The Cabinet of Eros: Renaissance Mythological Painting and the Studiolo of Isabella d’Este

    By Paul Holberton
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  • Framing the Nineteenth Century: Picture Frames 1837–1935

    By Nicholas Penny
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  • A life of John Julius Angerstein, 1735–1823: Widening circles in finance, philanthropy, and the arts in eighteenth-century London

    By Richard Green
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  • Gustav Klimt

    By John Collins
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  • Sculpture Today

    By Patrick Elliott
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  • Mezzaratta: Vitale e altri pittori per una confraternita Bolognese

    By Robert Gibbs
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  • Vilhelm Hammershøi

    By Rachel Sloan
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  • Wyndham Lewis

    By Andrew Causey
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  • American prints 1910–60

    By Martin Hopkinson
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  • Recent and current exhibitions

    By Nicholas Cullinan
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  • Twentieth-century British art

    By James Beechey
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  • Marie d'Orléans

    By Philip Ward-Jackson
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  • Bridget Riley

    By Paul Moorhouse
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  • Frames

    By Nicholas Penny
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  • The Renaissance Portrait

    By Jan Piet Filedt Kok
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  • Florence and the Netherlands

    By Beverly Louise Brown
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  • Anish Kapoor

    By James Lawrence
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  • El Greco to Velázquez

    By Xanthe Brooke
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  • The colour of life

    By Xavier Bray
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